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Belfast Agreement Explained

A copy of the agreement was published in every assembly in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland so that people could read before a referendum where they could vote. The peace process has successfully achieved the violence of unrest over the past two decades. Since the conclusion of the Good Friday Agreement in 1998, it has been necessary to pursue a number of other political and legal agreements aimed at consolidating the peace settlement provided for by the VPA. Unfortunately, it was not possible to reach an agreement on the implementation of the Stormont House agreement, which deals with the legacy of the past, as a time frame for discussions on the new beginning. The Irish and British governments have committed to continue work on this issue in order to create an agreed basis for the creation of a new institutional framework for the management of the past, as envisaged in the Stormont Agreement. The agreement consists of two related documents, both agreed on Good Friday, 10 April 1998 in Belfast: the agreement called for the creation of an independent commission to review police rules in Northern Ireland, «including ways to promote broad Community support» for these agreements. The UK government has also pledged to carry out a «large-scale review» of the criminal justice system in Northern Ireland. The Good Friday Agreement (GFA) or the Belfast Agreement (irish: Comhaonté Aoine an Chéasta or Comhaonté Bhéal Feirste; Ulster-Scots: Guid Friday Greeance or Bilfawst Greeance)[1] is a couple of agreements signed on 10 April 1998 that put an end to most of the violence of the Troubles, a political conflict in Northern Ireland that had erupted since the late 1960s. This was an important development in the Northern Ireland peace process in the 1990s.

Northern Ireland`s current system of de-decentralized government is based on the agreement. The agreement also created a number of institutions between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as well as between the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom. In these circumstances, power-sharing has proved impossible to maintain. Meanwhile, voters in each community began to turn away from moderate parties, and instead support for Sinn Féin and the DUP grew, supplanting the SDLP and UUP.

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